Dr Motsoko Pheko

Dr Motsoko Pheko

Why Africans have no land in South Africa

LAND! LAND! LAND! There is a lot of talk about land in South Africa today. It looks like some people have been asleep about this important national asset. Others who talk about land today in this country did their part in betraying the land question.

For the benefit of those who are genuinely concerned about this fundamental question I revisit the problem of land dispossession of Africans in South Africa. It stems from mutilated history, manipulation of international law and of course from those who betrayed the land question in South Africa in June 1955.

I will come to that later. But for now let me state that land dispossession of the African people did not fall from the sky. It formally started with the European Berlin General Act of 26 February 1885.This was at the Berlin Conference. It was when Belgium’s King Leopold reminded his fellow colonialists on the verge of stealing the whole Continent of Africa except modern Ethiopia that: “We are here to see how we should divide among ourselves this magnificent African cake.”

From that time seven Western European countries agreed to divide Africa among themselves into “Portuguese” Africa, “Spanish” Africa, “German” Africa, “French” Africa, “Belgian” Africa, “Italian” Africa, “British” Africa. South Africa (Azania) became part of “British” Africa. Somalia a tiny African country had the misfortune of becoming “French” Somaliland, “Italian” Somaliland, and “British” Somaliland.

Azania (South Africa) became a “British” territory with four colonies it renamed Cape colony, Natal, Orange Free State and Transvaal. All funny colonial names because Natal means “Christmas Day,” Vasco da Gama passed through there on 25 December 1497 “Orange Free State,” there are no oranges here. Moreover a colony could not be “free state” at the same time. Transvaal simply meant “across the Vaal.” – This was the name of an African river called Lekoa in the Sesotho language.

The British colonial law which created the union of these four colonies was cited as the Union South Africa Act 1909. It was passed directly by the British Parliament on 20th September 1909. It excluded and racially discriminated against Africans. Through the Native Land Act 1913, the Parliament of these colonial settlers allocated 93% of the African land to themselves. They were numbering 349,837 souls. This colonial parliament allocated the remaining 7% of land percent to over five million African owners of this African country.

Section 44 of this Union of South Africa Act 1909 stated the Qualifications of Members of the Assembly very clearly. “The Qualifications of Members of Assembly (Parliament)….He must be a British subject of European descent.”

The purpose of the four colonies of the Union of South Africa soon became clear. It was “to fight the native danger.” The Africans now became “danger” to the colonial invaders in their own African country. This is well documented by constitutional lawyers Gilbert Dold and C.P. Joubert in their book The British Commonwealth – The Development of Laws and Constitutions in South Africa pages 33, Stevens & Sons Ltd, London. See also Fowler and Smith in their book, History For The Senior Certificate and Matriculation page 428. Continue reading

AFRICA’S NAME KNOWLEDGE AND DYNAMICS

 AFRICA’S NAME KNOWLEDGE AND DYNAMICS

  1. MOTSOKO PHEKO

It is wrong history to teach that Africa was named by Greeks or Romans when these colonialists illegally occupied this unique continent through aggression and invasion. This was in332 B.C. until the Roman invasion in 30 B.C.

Africa got its name from Africans. It is estimated that there are six thousand languages in the world. 3000 of them are in Africa. If languages that have faded away are counted Africa had more than the present number.

One of the oldest names of Africa is Alkebu-Lan. This name has been interpreted as meaning “Mother of Nations” or “Mother of Mankind.” Africa is also one of the oldest names of this Continent. Many theories about who named   Africa have been thrown about.

  1. That the name came from a Roman soldier called Skippio Africanus.
  2. That the name is from Arabic Afriqiyah.
  3. That the name for Africa came from Leo Africanus. (1495-1554 A.D.). This date is too late for him. The Romans and the Greeks were long gone. This African scholar was a youth who was taken to slavery and later made a gift to Pope Leo X. This Pope realising this young man’s brilliant mind released him from slavery.
  4. During his life Leo Africanus is said to have travelled in Timbuktu in Mali and Songhai in present Nigeria. He patriotically associated his name with the great continent of his ancestors –Afrika. The forces of European imperialism had begun to inflict the continent through the Trans Atlantic Slave Trade.

Continue reading

Effects of Colonialism

EFFECTS OF COLONIALISM ON AFRICA PAST AND PRESENT ADDRESS BY MOTSOKO PHEKO AT (AZAPO) COMMEMORATION OF AFRICA LIBERATION DAY PIMVILLE COMMUNITY HALL SOWETO 26 MAY 2012

Programme Director, Comrades, Brothers and Sisters,

The effects of colonialism past and present are visible all over Africa. It is not an overstatement when Edem Kodjo, author of AFRICA TOMORROW describes the condition of African as “torn away from his past, propelled into a universe fashioned from outside that suppresses his values, and dumbfounded by a cultural invasion that marginalises him. The African,… is today the \deformed image of others. ”

On this year’s anniversary of Africa Liberation Day, African people all over Africa and wherever they may be on this planet, must reflect deeply on their history as it relates to their present life conditions and to their future. History is a clock that tells a people their historical time of the day. History is the compass that wise people use to locate themselves on the map of the world. A peoples’ history tells them who they are. What they have been, where they have been, where they are now, but most importantly, where they still must go. True African History is a powerful weapon against colonial history that has been used for mental enslavement and colonisation of the African people.

Programme Director,

Africa is the Mother of Humanity.  Africa is the cradle of the first human civilisation. The First Renaissance on this planet was the African Renaissance. Africa was “the first world” economically and technologically NOT the “third world” of paupers robbed of their lands and riches. Our ancestors built the pyramids which even in this 21st century no one can reproduce. Egyptian civilisation was a Black civilisation. The pharaohs were Black people. That is why that great African Egyptologist, Prof. Cheikh Anta Diop has written:

“The history of Black Africa will remain suspended in the air and will not be written correctly until African historians dare connect it with the history of Egypt. The African historian, who evades this, is neither modest nor objective or unruffled; he is ignorant, cowardly and neurotic.” Continue reading

AFRICAN LANGUAGES MUST BE RESTORED TO THEIR PRE-COLONIAL GLORY

AFRICAN LANGUAGES MUST BE RESTORED TO THEIR PRE-COLONIAL GLORY

BY DR MOTSOKO PHEKO

ADDRESSING DEPARTMENT OF LANGUAGES UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH AFRICA

12TH OCTOBER 2016

 Introduction

Our ancestors were agriculturists and pastoral farmers. If they followed the European year calendar system whose year begins in January, they would not have survived and we might not be here today. But they were very wise. They knew how nature works. They knew what time rain comes.

They knew what time some parts of this country experience frost which destroys harvest that is not ready at the right time. Their year calendar began in August(Phato) not in January (Pherekhong). This year had four seasons, namely Selemo –Spring, Hlabula – Summer – Hoetla – Autumn, Winter – Mariha.

Our ancestors dug gold, copper and other minerals. They were Iron experts long before Europe. They had never gone to school to study geology, but even their ordinary herdsmen and shepherdswho had never studied geology at any university, could identify an iron stone (morallana). These ancestors had a furnace technology through which they melted this iron stone (morallana) and shaped it into tools of agriculture, hoes, axes, spears etc

.They knew also how to preserve food for long time and for bad times of harvest. They dried fruits (mangangajane), corn, vegetables by exposing them to the sun.They preserved meat in the same way and made dihwapa. Biltong is a dihwapa product that was copied from Africans. The Basotho had also disiu to preserve their harvest. Continue reading

Sharing my exprerience with C.F.C

SHARNG MY EXPERIENCE WITH C. F.C. DR MOTSOKO PHEKO  Johannesburg 5th October 2016

After I knew Jesus Christ as my personal Saviour through the witness of a very saintly Canadian missionary Frank Read, I felt called to tell others about eternal life through Jesus Christ who not only raised the dead from their graves, but Himself died and came back to this life.(Acts 1:9)

I was already a budding writer. I was convinced that the printed word is a very powerful tool for evangelisation. An American Christian Donald Smith and I, and three other African brothers started a monthly magazine. We called it OUR AFRICA. I became its Managing Editor. It was demanding position. I had to study hard to increase my knowledge to be able to cope with my responsibilities.

This Christian magazine circulated in Southern and Eastern Africa. It had some regular readers also in England, America and Canada. Some copies of it can today be found in the archives of the University of South Africa – Documentary Centre for African Studies Accession No.33. OUR AFRICA had great impact. Thousands of people from various walks of life found Jesus Christ as their Saviour.

Many people became leaders in several spheres of life including Christian ministry. At least two became missionaries in America – Jerry Nkosi and Nathaniel Nkosi. Nathaniel was converted in the gold mines through an article I had written called A Dream In The Night.

He had run away from school and home. After his conversion to Christ he went back to his parents and attended school. He trained as a teacher. Later he went to Bible School in this country. That is how he eventually ended up in America as an Evangelist.   Continue reading

LAND LAW AND ECONOMIC LIBERATION

LAND LAW AND ECONOMIC LIBERATION KEYNOTE ADDRESS BY DR MOTSOKO PHEKO AT THE 4THSPRING LAW CONFERENCE, COLLEGE OF LAW UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH AFRICA PRETORIA
27 SEPTEMBER 2016
Programme Director, Distinguished Delegates Ladies and Gentlemen,
I thank the Convenors of the 4th Annual Spring Law Conference for inviting me to speak at this gathering and on such an important subject in our country – Land Law And Economic Liberation.
Life must be lived forward, but it can only be understood backward. As Cicero, a Roman philosopher put it many years ago, “To remain ignorant of things before you were born is to remain a child.”
Dr. John Hendrik Clarke, an African American professor of history has written, “History is a clock that tells a people their historical time of the day. It is a compass that people use to locate themselves on the map of human geography. A people’s history tells them what they have been, where they are now…more importantly, where they still must go.”
Our own Dr. Muziwakhe Anthony Lembede that philosopher and awakener of the youth in his generation advised, “One who wants to create a future must not forget the past.” Continue reading

MANGALISO ROBERT SOBUKWE MEMORIAL LECTURE

BY DR. MOTSOKO PHEKO AT THE METHODIST BLACK CONSULTATION SPRINGS GAUTENG SOUTH AFRICA 12TH JULY 2014

Programme Director, distinguished delegates, memorials help a nation to preserve its history and pass it on accurately from generation to generation for knowledge storage. Thank you for inviting me to give a memorial lecture on Mangaliso Robert Sobukwe, this giant Pan Africanist leader. The title of this lecture is: A LEADER WHO WALKED THE POLTICAL TALK TO THE FINISH.

Prof. Mangaliso Robert Sobukwe is a leader who walked the political talk to the finish. In the Biblical language, he ran the race and kept the faith. He went through a glorious contest with distinction. This is a man that the apartheid colonialist regime so silenced that even his closing speech in Court Case Number 173/60 was expunged from the Court record. Continue reading

PAN Africanism is The Road to Africa’s Security

 MOTSOKO PHEKO

Africa is a beautiful house that has been burning for some time with its children, women and men trapped inside. They are desperately trying to come out. As that Pan Africanist Dr. Nnamdi Azikiwe correctly put it, “This Continent [Africa], has had the bad luck to be over-run by [European] soldiers of fortune that had neither [moral] fibre nor humanity. Slavery played its shameful role in depopulating Africa. Capitalism denuded [Africa] of its wealth. Colonialism deprived Africa of its birthright, and imperialism emasculated its will to live as human being and enjoy its share of bounties of the earth.”

                   Africans Must Control Their Riches For Their People

Africa has immense wealth and resources. There is hardly an agricultural crop that cannot be produced on this great continent. And almost every kind of mineral is found in Africa – vanadium, chrome, uranium, cobalt, tantalum, platinum, gold, diamonds, iron, coal, oil etc. Africa is blessed with three types of climate; temperate, tropical and Mediterranean. Continue reading

Judgement of Supreme Court on Soweto Uprising

One of the students that the apartheid colonialist police shot dead on 16 June 1976 was Hector Pieterson. According to the late Rev. Benjamin Rajuili who was a minister of religion in the African Methodist Episcopal Church and a teacher at a High School in Soweto; the first student who was shot was his student named Mahabane.

It seems, however that another student who was shot before Hector Pieterson was Hastings Ndlovu. But in both these cases there were no photo journalists around when they were shot. Continue reading

Tribute to Former PAC President Clarence Mlamli Makwetu

6TH DECEMBER 1928 – 1ST APRIL 2016 – Buried 16 April 2016

  1. MOTSOKO PHEKO

We shall miss his charming smile. We shall miss his towering height – “uFafa” (the tall one), “uZikhali” (his clan name). We shall miss his frankness and bravery in matters of national importance affecting the land dispossessed people of Azania (South Africa). President Clarence Mlamli Makwetu served his people fearlessly even when it costs him imprisonment in various South African jails including Robben Island Prison and of course, banishment to areas where he had no means of livelihood for a job or self-employment. Continue reading